Towards a Digital and Media-Literate Europe: a Long and Winding Road?

Lorin Akbiyik, Rovena Carvalho Ferreira, Rodelio Concepcion, Andira Figueroa Vargas, Sasha Miller, Sara Teklay

In the core of today’s digital society, social media reigns supreme. It combines social interactions, entertainment and source of news, not to mention that it created a shift from users as mere spectators to users also as creators of content. On your timelines you see not only posts from the friends, groups and pages that you follow (which normally already include a large amount of clickbait, but also, due to the work of algorithms, suggested posts come around often. To be able to comb through this sea of information floating around – which may include hate speech, fake news and other harmful content – and distinguish what are reliable sources or not, being a digital and media literate is paramount.

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Digital and media illiterates are easier prey to online fake news, senior citizens are considered more vulnerable in this scenario.

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Social Media as a Promising Arena for Public Debate

Dimitra Kagioglou, Dinesh George Lourdes, Evgeniya Kreslova, Maria Oliva, Nele Mirjam Werner, Siyu Xu

Once upon a time, the political debates were provided to the public through media reporting. Now within a minute we are able to get informed instantly via social media. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Youtube are a new communication field being used by the EU Institutions to communicate with the audiences and particularly with young citizens.

Could this imply that we are in front of an alternative public sphere shaped by social media, that can rouse young citizens to engage in the EU debate? Well, potentially.

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