Losing My Attention? Journalism’s Renewed Interest in Content and Membership Models

Janneke Aerssens, Spriha Dhanuka, Katharina Beck, Rosanna Fanni, Ana Sofia Madrid Vargas, Sameer Padania, Giordano Zambelli, Mehmet Solmaz

Attention has always been a finite resource, even more so in an era of super abundance of information. Having the power to attract and manage it has been a struggle from the moment citizens had a say in what happens in society. Attention merchants were already there, before the internet and the so-called information society. Why then is attention now such a hot topic? Has the attention economy trapped the news industry? Is there a fire exit?

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Journalism in the Digital Storm

Bianca Manelli, Chantal Cocherová, Georgios Evgenidis, Jiahuan He, Lara Corrado, Suhasni      Midha, Yuliia Hladka, Zeynep Atilgan Ozgenc

What is news? What makes somebody a journalist? In the era of social media and blogs, the answers to these questions are not as clear as they were 10 years ago. With professional journalism still struggling to work through the digitalization of media, the rise of citizen journalism challenges the definition of both news and journalist.

Citizen smartphone journalism

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Press Freedom Status in Turkey: From Free to Not Free

Anna-Katharina Ahnefeld, Oyumaa Batsukh, Merve Keçeli, Yu-Hsuan Lin and Man Wai Tam

Independent journalism in Turkey is now at its darkest moment. In merely a decade, the country has turned from a place with improving press freedom to a prison for journalists. In 2004, Turkey stood 98 among 167 countries on the press freedom ranking released by Reporters Without Borders. In 2018, the number dropped to 157. The drastic decline in press freedom, together with the rising authoritarian ruling, has made Turkey the most freedom-deteriorating country in the world.

As of May 11, there are 192 journalists jailed, 142 wanted in Turkey. While the upcoming Presidential Election on June 24 is showing intense competition, candidates from opposition parties are heavily oppressed and the Turkish media are forced to give unanimous voice.  Selahattin Demirtaş, presidential candidate from People’s Democratic Party (HDP), has been running his campaign from the jail. TRT (Turkish Radio and Television Corporation), the national broadcaster, is criticized for only broadcasting mass meetings held by the current President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. Another candidate, Meral Akşener from İYİ Party, claims that news workers at a television channel were fired only because of broadcasting her mass meeting for 10 seconds.

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