Towards a Digital and Media-Literate Europe: a Long and Winding Road?

Lorin Akbiyik, Rovena Carvalho Ferreira, Rodelio Concepcion, Andira Figueroa Vargas, Sasha Miller, Sara Teklay

In the core of today’s digital society, social media reigns supreme. It combines social interactions, entertainment and source of news, not to mention that it created a shift from users as mere spectators to users also as creators of content. On your timelines you see not only posts from the friends, groups and pages that you follow (which normally already include a large amount of clickbait, but also, due to the work of algorithms, suggested posts come around often. To be able to comb through this sea of information floating around – which may include hate speech, fake news and other harmful content – and distinguish what are reliable sources or not, being a digital and media literate is paramount.

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Digital and media illiterates are easier prey to online fake news, senior citizens are considered more vulnerable in this scenario.

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Tackling Transparency in the Facebook Era

Sofia Elanidou, Sofía Cisneros Gavín, Sarah Markewich, Pauline Ranscelot, Stefi Stampoulian, Hande Yılmaz

If we focus on solutions rather than on problems, “transparency” might be a good choice for the 2018 Word of the Year and a logical follow up to “fake news;” the 2017 winner.

Transparency Finally Takes Off,” is one of the 2018 “Predictions for Journalism” in Nieman Lab’s list via CUNY Journalism School’s Carrie Brown Smith. She says it’s time for the media to recognize the importance of showing “exactly how they work.

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DIGITAL Technologies, DIGITAL laws&Digital Mentality?

How to innovate the European audiovisual and media sector?

Evgeniia Totmianina, Sarah Rungo, Leonardo Scarcella, Guillaume Adamo, Nina van der Giessen, Manuel Perez.

European policy developments and audiovisual markets are under siege: GDPR regulation, the Digital Single Market, and Brexit are at stake. Professors Pawels and Loisen suggests, that after too many partially failed attempts some results leading to a Digital Revolution in the Audiovisual Market are needed. Some insight can be won by looking at digital natives and their use of media and maybe more important, their relationship with media.

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“Digital Single Market” emerged as part of the EU Horizon 2020 initiative (2014) and actions within this project offer new challenges and opportunities for broadcasters and service providers. Keeping up with new demands and possibilities in the broadcasting sector, such as “re-distribution and spreading of content among peer-to-peer networks or through any form of social networking as part of a shared media experience” (Ibrus & Rohn, 2016), means that new regulations are needed.

The 2016-2017 agenda, in which innovations to the broadcasting sector are proposed (ICT-19-2017 & ICT-20-2017), deal with copyright issues and content sharing opportunities. Interestingly, the focus on the issue of intended as well as unintended online piracy can mostly be related to how millennials use digital media.

Will the digital single market be the long-awaited answer towards a united European audiovisual market?

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