Unconscious Writers, Unconscious Readers: Democracy Endangered

Lien Verstraeten, Jara Dichas, Melisa Zelaya & Robert Saura

On 12 January 2017, the European Parliament assessed a draft resolution relating to the regulation of automation and robots. However, until today, the EU has not implemented such legislation.

In a continuously changing digital era, the EU has mainly been focussing on protecting EU citizens; in 2016, the Union succeeded in approving the GDPR. The directive was designed to harmonise data privacy laws across the EU and to protect EU citizens’ data privacy.

“Greater efficiency can free up reporters from mundane tasks, but it can also warp what journalism is and what we want it to be”                    Carlson, 2018

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Educating Youngsters towards a Brighter Future. The Time is Now!

Farah Al Doori, Olga Kaferinova, Ina Krasteva, Ramona Mantescu, Eleni Myrtsioti, Ebenezer Toga, Antoni Tsekov

“A child miseducated is a child lost”, John F. Kennedy once said. Many would argue that as we live in times when all the knowledge in the world is a mouse click away. Yes and no. The rapid development of artificial intelligence and the digital technologies nowadays clearly proves that each aspect of our children’s lives will be different than ours.

Today’s pre-schoolers will join the workforce in 2035. To give them a springboard to the future, we need to ensure they possess the necessary skills to be competitive. Nothing will replace reading, writing, and arithmetic skills but mastering them only, would not guarantee a prosperous future. As we will prove below, we need to invest time, money and efforts to improve today’s kids’ digital competences. Furthermore, we need to encourage them to discover and develop their affinity in STEM subjects, regardless of their gender. Continue reading “Educating Youngsters towards a Brighter Future. The Time is Now!”

Tackling Transparency in the Facebook Era

Sofia Elanidou, Sofía Cisneros Gavín, Sarah Markewich, Pauline Ranscelot, Stefi Stampoulian, Hande Yılmaz

If we focus on solutions rather than on problems, “transparency” might be a good choice for the 2018 Word of the Year and a logical follow up to “fake news;” the 2017 winner.

Transparency Finally Takes Off,” is one of the 2018 “Predictions for Journalism” in Nieman Lab’s list via CUNY Journalism School’s Carrie Brown Smith. She says it’s time for the media to recognize the importance of showing “exactly how they work.

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Russian Trolls: It Can (And Probably will) Happen Again

Aurelija Gackaitė, Rugilė Jakučionytė, Zahaid Rehman, Miriam Siemon, Xuerui Wu and Anastasia Yakubovich

Propaganda takes many shapes and forms, but in recent history, it has been masked under the guise of civic participation and political awareness on social media. This is clearly evident in the case of the 2016 US elections and the now-famous (or infamous) Russian troll factory that was seen actively trying to spread misinformation against the Hilary Clinton campaign, adding support for President Trump in the process.

Since then, several former ‘trolls’ from the Russia-based Internet Research Agency (IRA) – seen as one of the major actors in disseminating misinformation in the campaign process – have stated that they were not lured into working for IRA to push any agenda, whether related to civic participation or propaganda; they were simply incentivised through a better salary than most other writing jobs.

group17-0.1 Continue reading “Russian Trolls: It Can (And Probably will) Happen Again”

Is Staying in your Filter Bubble what you really want?

Andrea Ruiz Valencia, Nele Pärje, Maxime Paquin, Jija Bhattacharya, Alice Masoni, Christos Kampolis

The Digital Single Market (DSM) Strategy aims to overcome the fragmentation of the European market and merge 28 markets into a single digital economy. To prepare the digital grounds for the DSM to flourish, several obstacles need to be tackled, one of which revolves around the personalization of the Internet. There is a disturbing phenomenon in the way online platforms operate today, notably the way algorithms predict and select content we want to consume.

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GDPR: Societal Retribution

Merve Bektas, Yasmim Pessoa, Kaia Socha, Laura Basiacco, Justyna Zawada, Artaban Micali Drossos

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We have all undoubtedly seen this request pop up in front of our faces as we navigate literally every website we decide to surf. Let’s be honest, how many of us even know to what exactly we are agreeing to? Yet every day we put our trust in the hands of companies without knowing the specifics of their terms and conditions. The willingness to login quickly, to buy a distinct product, or book an Airbnb overpowers the one of reading the 20 pages dedicated to those terms.

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Can someone blame us for not wanting to read those tedious conditions?

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AI on the Driving Seat?

New ethical and legal questions when it comes to self-driving cars

Hui Ding, Guanwen Li, Ana Pop Stefanija, Mattia Trino,  Natalie Walow, Manlin Zhu

Does AI need an introduction?

Year 2018. With the latest advancement of artificial intelligence and its increased usage in vast areas of societal life, the chances you asked yourself at least once “Will robots take over our jobs?”, “Who will be responsible for the self-driving cars if something bad happens?” are big.

Today, one of the most quoted examples is the development of autonomous vehicles, which could bring positive changes to traffic management, security and urban development, but also rise complex legal issues and ethical dilemmas. When talking about it, the first question we should keep in mind is “who is accountable when a self-driving car causes an accident?”. Meanwhile, try to think about Asimov’s first law: “A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm”. Thus, how come that a robot built according to Asimov’s laws could cause an accident? Practice says, it already happens, unfortunately. Furthermore, in an algorithmically unforeseen situation, who would the car hit: the kid crossing the street, the old person at the sidewalk, or will it crash against a wall killing the person inside the car? It comes clear, at this point, that we are in front of many AI-related legal and ethical issues and there’s no easy solution.

Self-driving car

 What self-driving cars at an intersection would look like

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